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Characteristics

  • Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is a genetic mutation affecting many breeds that causes developmental defects in the eye that can lead to vision deficits or blindness. This defect can be diagnosed by a veterinary ophthalmologist between 6 and 8 weeks of age by visualizing spots of choroidal hypoplasia or a colobomas . It can be associated with microphthalmia or enophthalmia. It can lead to retinal detachment and blindness. Although laser repair of partial retinal detachments can be attempted if detected in early stages, there is generally no treatment for CEA. Vision varies depending on the extent of the lesions and some dogs will become blind. Prevention requires not breeding animals that carry the mutation and this can be achieved through genetic testing of breeding dogs.

  • No, it is not a Lab with a perm - those fashionable and form-fitting curls are all natural for the aptly named Curly-Coated Retriever. One of the most eye-catching of the sporting breeds, the Curly boasts curls that would take us hours at the hairdresser to achieve, yet the coat maintenance of the Curly is surprisingly simple.

  • The Dachshund has an unmistakable look – long low body on short legs - that has earned it the nickname "Wiener Dog." Full of attitude, the Dachshund seeks the spotlight and demands attention, but offers loyalty, affection, and plenty of comedy in return.

  • Of all dog breeds, the Dalmatian is the most easily identified because of his distinctive coat. The image of a large white dog speckled with black spots all over his body, sitting on top of a fire truck or running along side a horse-drawn coach, is embedded in the minds of everyone, dog lover or no, regardless of age.

  • Dandie Dinmont Terriers are live-wire dogs that enjoy rousing play, yet can be as tough as nails when extracting a rodent from its den or when standing up to a challenge.

  • This handout discusses excessive drooling (hyper-salivation) in dogs. There can be many causes for this particular complaint, and a short discussion of the more common reasons is included. Further diagnostic and treatment options are outlined.

  • Cats are not completely color blind as they can see yellow and blue as well as shades of grey. Their eye structure does allow them to see better in dim light compared to people. Near-sightedness is common among cats.

  • The simple answer to a complicated, much researched question is, yes! Dogs do recognize our facial expressions which makes them wonderful family members.

  • Knowing how and what your dog can see will help you make good choices for her. For example, you should keep your dog’s color range in mind when shopping for toys. She will enjoy yellow and blue toys more than red ones. And you’ll understand why she gets distracted during a game of fetch as she hones in on a bird flying 50 yards away. You’ll also know that to get her complete attention, you should stand directly in front of her where her range of visual acuity is greatest. And the next time you are lucky enough to be graced with a rainbow in the sky, rest assured that your dog can enjoy it, too. She will not see ALL the colors of the rainbow, but she may see a bit of yellow and blue. And that will be just fine for her!

  • Dobies can be great family pets and most have been bred to live happily in the human environment. These large beauties are fiercely loyal, inspiring to look at, and endearing once you get to know them. They will protect you and stand by you in any situation.